Fern

There are so many easy to grow fern varieties you can add to your houseplant collection. It has been estimated there are over 10,000 different species of ferns. Ferns are found all over the world in almost every continent. They are mostly found in high moisture climates; such as tropical rain forests. Most fern species have leaves, called fronds. These leaves are composed of blade-like leaves, called pinnae, attached to a stem.

VARIETIES OF FERNS

Kimberly Queens Nephrolepis obliterata:

 

The Kimberly Queen plant is native to Australia that is characterized by large, gently arching stems. They commonly are found both as outdoor and indoor plants. When grown as a house plant, Kimbery Queens are considered to clean the air by reducing indoor air pollution and toxins. 

Water : You will know you need to water your fern once the fonds start to become paler than their typical color. If the fonds become crispy, and brown, it is a reflection of over watering. Allow about 3 inches of soil to dry out before watering. During drier months, Kimberly Queen plants may need watering multiple times during the week. 

Light : bright / indirect light - north facing window is best 

Staghorn Platycerium bifurcatum:

Staghorn ferns are native to Asia and Australia. These ferns are slow growing and able to grow epiphytic (grow mounted on plaques or other objects). Their root structure is ball like that takes up water and nutrients. 

 

Water : Ensure the soil stays moist without drowning the fern. If there is extra water that comes through to the saucer make sure to discard so there is no standing water; which can lead to root rot. Your fern will start to turn brown or black towards the base of the plant if receiving to much water. This fern can tolerate a slightly drier conditions, and will slightly wilt when in need of water. In the winter months, Staghorn ferns need less water than warmer months. 

Light : medium to bright light / consistent shaded light ; will not do well in low light 

Birds Nest Asplenium nidus:

 The Bird's Nest fern are very fragile, and can easily be damaged if touched. They are naturally epiphytic (grow mounted on plaques or other objects), and can grow up to 2 feet long when grown indoors. 

Water : Bird’s Nest Fern will tolerate soil that dries out from time to time. Bird’s Nest fern can easily get a bacterial or fungal infection if their leaves don't stay dry. If they get water in the center (crown) it can easily cause the plant to start to rot.

Light : medium to low light

The more light it receives, the more the leaves will crinkle, and the less light, the flatter the leaves will be. But there is such thing as to much direct sunlight; which will cause the fronds on the fern to yellow and die.

Foxtail Asparagus densiflorus:

Foxtail ferns have pine needle-like leaves that have a plush, straight branches. The Foxtail fern is a member of the asparagus family; making it actually not even a fern! The difference is it uses seeds to reproduce; where as ferns use spores. Foxtail ferns also can produce small, white flowers that can further produce bright, red berries. 

Water : Allow about 3 inches of soil to dry out before watering. Foxtail fern can tolerate drier periods. When it is time, water thoroughly, and allow the excess to drain out the bottom of well-draining soil. Ensure the soil stays moist without drowning the fern. If there is extra water that comes through to the saucer make sure to discard so there is no standing water; which can lead to root rot.

Light : soft, shaded light / indirect light 

Lemon Button Nephrolepis cordifolia ‘Duffii’.:

Lemon Button Fern is one of the smallest ferns growing about a foot tall. They are one of the easiest plants to use in vivariums. 

Water : Allow about 3 inches of soil to dry out before watering. When it is time, water thoroughly, and allow the excess to drain out the bottom of well-draining soilEnsure the soil stays moist without drowning the fern. If there is extra water that comes through to the saucer make sure to discard so there is no standing water; which can lead to root rot. You will know you need to water your fern once the fonds start to become paler than their typical color. 

Light : medium to bright, indirect light

EASY CARE FACTS:

Lighting:

Most ferns thrive in bright, filtered, low-light to thrive. It is suggested to avoid harsh, direct sun as this can burn the delicate fronds, and it can cause browning. It is best to place them in a room with north or east-facing windows. If your ferns are in a windowless room, it can thrive under a fluorescent bulb. 

Water:

Water your fern when 1-3" of soil becomes dry, then thoroughly drench until the water drains through the bottom either into a sink, saucer, etc. If the pot is standing in a saucer, ensure to empty the saucer of any standing water the the roots don't drown and cause rot. Ferns can be sensitive to hard water. If you have tap water that has lots of salt, fluorine, or chlorine in it you may need to switch to filtered water. Otherwise, leave your water out overnight before watering. 

Fertilizing:

When applying fertilizer the soil should be moist, never applying to dry soil. Dilute to half the recommended strength, and feed about once per month. Fertilizing is only necessary during warmer months due ferns naturally growing slower in the winter. 

Humidity:

One word : Humidifier. Get one and your fern will flourish.

None of the most common ferns can tolerate dry conditions for long. When to dry, fronds will quickly turn brown, and they will begin to drop leaves. Stand the pot on a tray of pebbles or clay granules and keep those wet. This increases the humidity around the plant without keeping the roots wet and chancing root rot. It is suggested to keep your ferns in rooms with high humanity such as the bathroom or kitchen. 

Temperature:

between 65-80 degrees

Keep your Fern away from blowing air or drafty areas, as it can cause damage to its delicate leaves.

Toxicity:

Ferns are non-toxic to humans and pets.

Fern Facts  

Some ferns are epiphytic ferns; meaning they typically grows on things other than soil, such as tree trunks and rocks. Because of this, you can attach them to a plank and hang it on a wall as a piece of living art!

Ferns reproduce through spores, meaning they produce neither seeds nor flowers.